Fashionable Body Hair For Women In The 18Th Century The History of Leather

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The History of Leather

The use of animal skins for clothing and basic survival items can be traced back to early humans during the Paleolithic period. A cave painting found in a cave near Lleida, Spain, depicts the use of leather clothing. Humans hunted wild animals for food, but skinned their carcasses and used them as crude tents, clothing, and footwear.

Early humans found that hides decayed rapidly and became useless. They needed a way to preserve their hides. The earliest method involved stretching the bark of the ground to dry and rubbing it with fat or animal brains as it dried. It had limited preserving and softening action. We also discovered that smoke can preserve hides and hides. It seems that he discovered the first way to make leather.

Much later, it was discovered that earth salts containing alum were used as tanning agents to produce soft, white leather.Alum leather can be dyed with natural dyes from a variety of plants. In Egyptian times, leather was used for sandals, clothing, gloves, buckets, bottles, shrouds for burying the dead, and military equipment. I am drawing.

The Romans also used leather extensively for footwear, clothing, and military equipment such as shields, saddles, and harnesses. The manufacture of leather was introduced to England by Roman invaders and religious groups.For writing purposes.

The ancient British used leather for many purposes, from footwear, clothing and leather bags to military items. The hulls of early boats known as coracles were also covered with leather. Over the centuries, leather production expanded steadily, and by the Middle Ages most towns and villages had tanneries in their local streams and rivers. They used it as a source of water for processing and to power their waterwheel-driven machinery. , Leather Lane and other street names remain.

Early rawhide was made by first soaking raw hides and skins in a fermenting solution of organic matter, in which bacteria proliferate and attack the hides and skins, resulting in the loosening of hair and wool and the removal of hides. The protein dissolved out. Next, the hair or wool was scraped off with a primitive blunt stone or wooden scraper, and any fat or meat still adhering to the meat side was removed in a similar manner.

Tanning, the process of turning fur into leather, was done by dusting the raw stock with other organics of ground bark and placing it in a shallow pit or tank of tannin solution. The solution penetrated the skin structure and took up to two years for very thick skins. The leather was then hung in an open shed for several days. Leather finishing involves peeling or shaving to a uniform thickness, coloring, treating with oils and greases, and using waxes, proteins such as blood or egg albumin, and shellac to smooth the surface of the grain. Allow to dry and final treat for an attractive surface finish.

During the Middle Ages, leather was used for a variety of purposes including footwear, clothing, leather bags, cases and trunks, leather bottles, saddlery and saddlery, chair and sofa upholstery, bookbinding, and military applications. It was also used for the chairs of coaches, sedans, and wall decoration.Most of the leather was tanned with oak bark, but the leather for soft clothing, gloves, and footwear was tanned with alum, oil, and these oils. It was tanned with a combination of two materials.With the discovery and introduction of basic chemicals such as lime and sulfuric acid, tanners gradually abandoned traditional methods and leather production slowly shifted to chemical It has become a series of processes based on

The growth of industrialization in the 18th and 19th centuries created demand for many new types of leather. For example, leather for belts to drive machinery introduced in industry, special leathers used in looms in the textile industry, leathers used as diaphragms, etc. Leather for washers, transportation and furniture upholstery.

At the end of the 19th century, the invention of the automobile, modern roads, a new range of coal tar dyes, the demand for softer, lighter footwear with a fashionable look, and a general rise in living standards led to an increase in demand for shoes. Was born. Soft, supple and colorful leather. Traditional vegetable tanned leather was too hard and too thick for these requirements, so the use of metallic chromium salts was adopted and chrome tanning became the tanning of modern footwear and fashion leather. We produce soft, supple, beautiful, high-quality leather that reflects our way of life.

I hope you enjoy this little history lesson.

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